it’s sorting day at Mex Rev class

[for HIST 566, WNMU, 15 July 2017] I’m at a bit of a loss for this first assigned blog post. We’re in the third module of the class, and I’m still trying to place the players in a mental timeline. Who supported or competed with whom seems more complex in the context of the Mexican … Continue reading it’s sorting day at Mex Rev class

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Social Power, Dominance, and Threat

[Literature Review, for PSY 540: Interpersonal Psychology, WNMU, Spring 2017] As with many things human, social power is not as salient as a constant, as it is when it’s measured in differences. That is, the differences in individuals’ relative power have a strongly influential function in interpersonal relations, and it’s doubtful that any sort of … Continue reading Social Power, Dominance, and Threat

Review of Thorne’s “The Conversion of Englishmen and the Conversion of the World Inseparable”

[for HIST 518: Colonialism, WNMU, 8 May 2017] I’ve chosen to review Susan Thorne’s essay, “’The Conversion of Englishmen and the Conversion of the World Inseparable’: Missionary Imperialism and the Language of Class in Early Industrial Britain” (1997). This essay addresses the complex question of how racism, classism, colonialism, and evangelism interacted in imperial Britain. Thorne … Continue reading Review of Thorne’s “The Conversion of Englishmen and the Conversion of the World Inseparable”

Pinkertons: Policing labor in the American West

Written December 2, 2015   Policing in the American West began as corporate security in the mid-1800s. The philosophies that shaped that initial endeavor were a powerful force in American policing nationally, through the 19020s and into the early 30s. The first big businesses in the West were the railroads, crossing wildernesses that, for their … Continue reading Pinkertons: Policing labor in the American West

Context for Carlisle: Whiteness and Native Assimilation 1880-1900

Written November 7, 2015   It was the end of the Indian Wars. The buffalo were dead and the Indians were starving on their reservations[1]. The rations handed out on reservations by the federal government looked fiscally unsustainable. “After the conquest,” says historian Patricia Limerick, “Indians were a population in trouble, with massive unemployment and … Continue reading Context for Carlisle: Whiteness and Native Assimilation 1880-1900