Book Review: Revolutionary Parks, by Emily Wakild

  [Written for HIST 566: Mexican Revolution, WNMU, 2 Aug 2017] Wakild began with the claim that “Mexico’s national parks were an outgrowth of revolutionary affinities for both rational science and social justice.” (p. 1) It’s curious, Wakild points out, that a nation that led the world in acreage dedicated to national park land, and … Continue reading Book Review: Revolutionary Parks, by Emily Wakild

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[Book Review] Widow Basquiat: A Love Story, by Jennifer Clement

I'd seen Basquiat's name in my art history books. I didn't learn how to pronounce it. His work never spoke to me, then. I was looking for something more ephemeral, something more fitting to my adolescent pretentiousness. I forgot about him, somewhere in the next chapter. I chose to read Widow Basquiat: A Love Story, … Continue reading [Book Review] Widow Basquiat: A Love Story, by Jennifer Clement

[Book Review] Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil, by Paul Bloom

OVERALL: Paul Bloom is a developmental psychologist, but in his exploration of human morality, Just Babies, he promises to include a broader disciplinary scope. True to his word, the text makes references to Herodotus as smoothly as Louis C.K., without straying from the point. Bloom's thesis is clear: that morality is something all people have naturally, in varying … Continue reading [Book Review] Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil, by Paul Bloom