the Washington “Redskins” football team as a cultural artifact of colonialism

[Written for HIST 518: Colonialism, WNMU, 3 May 2017] It's hard to say whether the ‘redskins’ mascot is emblematic of colonialism or postcolonialism, because depending on the perspective you take, it might be either. It is postcolonial because it could be considered a relic of colonization and the genocide of Native Americans by the Europeans … Continue reading the Washington “Redskins” football team as a cultural artifact of colonialism

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the walls of São Paulo as a cultural artifact

[Written for HIST 518: Colonialism, WNMU, 18 April 2017] "History teaches us that this dialectic gives rise to separatist sentiment. If co-existence is impossible, it is only logical that indigenous groups acquire an identity based on exclusion, and adopt a radical posture calling for the expulsion of the invaders and the recuperation of sovereignty lost." … Continue reading the walls of São Paulo as a cultural artifact

Book Review: Revolutionary Parks, by Emily Wakild

  [Written for HIST 566: Mexican Revolution, WNMU, 2 Aug 2017] Wakild began with the claim that “Mexico’s national parks were an outgrowth of revolutionary affinities for both rational science and social justice.” (p. 1) It’s curious, Wakild points out, that a nation that led the world in acreage dedicated to national park land, and … Continue reading Book Review: Revolutionary Parks, by Emily Wakild

Radio-Télévision Libre des Mille Collines and Colonialism in Rwanda: The Creation of Ethnic Violence

[Written for HIST 518: Colonialism, WNMU, May 10, 2017] Whereas settler colonialism is intimately tied to the genocide of indigenous populations, the colonization of Rwanda crafted a genocide within the indigenous population, a genocide that resulted from – not in – the corruption of the native culture. In an essay published in June 1994, anthropologist Alex … Continue reading Radio-Télévision Libre des Mille Collines and Colonialism in Rwanda: The Creation of Ethnic Violence

Review of Thorne’s “The Conversion of Englishmen and the Conversion of the World Inseparable”

[for HIST 518: Colonialism, WNMU, 8 May 2017] I’ve chosen to review Susan Thorne’s essay, “’The Conversion of Englishmen and the Conversion of the World Inseparable’: Missionary Imperialism and the Language of Class in Early Industrial Britain” (1997). This essay addresses the complex question of how racism, classism, colonialism, and evangelism interacted in imperial Britain. Thorne … Continue reading Review of Thorne’s “The Conversion of Englishmen and the Conversion of the World Inseparable”